The Passing of Time

black and white photo of clocks

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When I saw this photo it gave me a flash of inspiration. A mass of clocks all ticking at the same time. I think, as you grow older time seems to fly by; you sometimes find yourself wondering where the time goes…

 

The Passing of Time

 

Tick, tock, tick, tock

Faster and faster

Time flies by

In days

Then months

Into years….

*****

My head’s spinning

Where are we going?

Falling, further

And further…

 *****

It’s another new day

A baby cries

Longing for its milk

Placated by it’s bottle

 

Morning chorus singing

As a child murmurs

Teddy dangling from its hand

Questioning, all the time

 

Noonday sun shines bright

A school child plays

Dreaming of home time

But has no answers

 

In the heat of the afternoon

A teenager fashionista

Self consciously

Struggles to understand

 

In the fading sun

An adult works hard

Earning a daily living

Hoping to achieve

 

Darkness surrounds us now

As an old person reads

Looking for inspiration

What is it all for?

 *****

The tick, tock, tick, tock

Is it even faster and faster still….

Sadly, time

Slows for no one.

Poem by Nick

In the Spooky Graveyard 👻

night building forest trees
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To all my followers, Happy Halloween, I hope you enjoy my poem…

 

In the Spooky Graveyard 🎃

 

Walking the steep

Winding path

Into the old graveyard

A deep dank mist

Hovers all around me

 

💀💀💀

 

Darkness is falling

Strange shadows

Fall across my path

Spooky feelings

Sink slowly

Into my head

 

☠️☠️☠️

 

I rest on a bench

Suddenly, behind me

A huge gust

blows leaves high

Into the air

I don’t feel alone

 

👻👻👻

 

Swiftly I hurry

Back to the gate

A slight terror

Fills my mind

Is it unearthly

Forces at work?  

 

🎃🎃🎃

 

Poem by Nick 

Discovering Florence…

aerial photography of city
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Sometimes it’s easier to focus on others to put your own problems into perspective.

You may of read about Florence Nightingale as a student, but you may not be aware of her link to fibromyalgia or indeed Florence, Italy.

She was an inspiring person who despite illness and injury, lived an exceptional life.

Florence was quoted as saying

There is no part of my life, upon which I can look back without pain”

Florence was born on May 12, 1820, in Florence, Italy, after which she was named. She was the youngest of two children.

Florence was born into a wealthy family and was expected to get married and have a children. Florence rebelled against this stereotype. She had always helped to care for sick people and started working as a nurse.

Florence was sent to nurse injured soldiers during the Crimean War. She proved to be a very dedicated nurse; visiting the injured every evening on a regular basis which started the phrase ‘the Lady with the Lamp’.

Because of her influence in nursing practices unsanitary areas were improved which increased the survival rate of patients.

Florence wrote about her nursing techniques from experience, which formed the basics for standards in nursing care adopted for the profession.

During 1860 St Thomas’ Hospital and the Nightingale School for Nursing was opened.

blue and silver stetoscope
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Florence and fibromyalgia

Florence suffered from an invisible illness after she returned from nursing solders in the Crimea War.

Her symptoms are reminiscent of fibromyalgia; which was not a recognised condition at the time. Florence spent prolonged periods in bed, due to her illness. This was probably triggered by excessive stress carrying out her duties nursing in terrible conditions.

In recent years soldiers from the Gulf  War have gone on to develop fibromyalgia after they returned from war. The unbearable stress they were exposed to at that time triggering fibromyalgia.

Florence died on August 13, 1910; she received the Order of Merit in 1907 for her contribution to modern nursing practices. Florence was an amazing woman who cared for others and put others health before her own.

Mobility Secrets with Fibromyalgia

photography of woman in pink tank top stretching arm
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It’s really important to keep as healthy as possible, as your level of stamina fluctuates so much.

When you have Fibromyalgia it is a daunting prospect, keeping fit. Particularly starting out for the first time, with a new exercise.

On a visit to my Physiotherapist recently I mentioned I go walking regularly. She said doing moderate exercise can build up strength and help with mobility.

After I was was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2004, I found that exercise helped me a lot to keep a reasonable level of mobility. But I struggled to find things I could do. 

I have made a list of everything that has helped me that you could try. If you’re starting out try hydrotherapy first and then some gentle flexibility exercises.

Hydrotherapy

I found gentle exercise in a warm water pool can help. The water supports your body and has less impact on muscles and joints.

Research has shown that lying in warm water helps the body to relax and lowers pain perception.

A therapist that specialises in hydrotherapy or a qualified physiotherapist that has a good understanding of fibromyalgia, can help you to work out some exercises.

Your local sports centre or gym may have these facilities and let you have a couple of trial sessions.

Sitting Exercises

If you have limited mobility, sitting exercises could be a better option than other ways of exercise.

The NHS website has sitting exercises along with flexibility exercises that might be worth trying.

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Pilates

Pilates strengthens the body as a whole, the main aim is to improve core strength. Regular sessions can help to reduce the risk of injury by increasing flexibility.

I  developed my own tailored exercise routine, by trying out different exercises, from visits to a physiotherapy practitioner.

If you go for physio ask the practitioner for advice and help about what exercises are best for you.

I practice these regularly once a day, for about ten minutes in total. Although, I had to work up to doing this amount gradually at first.

Walking

I found walking to be the most accessible and best for my circumstances.  Walking can help to boost your energy levels and enjoy nature.

If you suffer from low mood, walking on a regular basis is a good non medical therapy, to help feel more positive.

If you are on a low-income, it’s no problem to try out as there is no sign up charges.

If you are new to walking it is best to start with 5 to 10 minutes at first and gradually increase this as your body gets used to the exercise

You will need to try out a pattern that suits you.

When you first start you may need to get some comfortable shoes and wrap up well with thermal layers on cold days.

Have a look at my post on walking  for more tips.

woman street friends fun
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The NHS live well  website has a lot of really useful tips to get you active.

I hope this post has helped to give you ideas to improve mobility for Fibromyalgia. My goal is as always to help others with Fibromyalgia and similar invisible illness.

 

#Autumn approaches

autumn autumn colours autumn leaves background
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It’s that time of year again when it starts to get cooler, after the baking summer sun. The days grow shorter and leaves on the trees are just starting to change colour. 

I’ve written a poem inspired by the changing landscape called Autumn Chill.

🍂 Autumn Chill 🍂

 

Light picks out the gentle rippling on a lake

Clouds hang heavily in the sky above

 

Their grey shadows dance clumsily on the water

revealing a light mist in the distance

 

Splinters of brilliant light highlight treetops

Golden hues glinting their changing colours

 

The air feels cool and fresh

Still a brief hint of summer lingers

 

Subtle leaf tones of red, purple, orange and green

Jump towards me from a transforming bush

 

The weakening sunlight is fading now

Autumn splendour slowly unfolding 

Poem by Nick

If you enjoyed reading this poem, take a look at my other poems and short stories. I’ve recently included a menu header with them all in one section entitled Poetry and Writing.

The secrets to better #sleep…

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A few simple changes can make a difference to your quality of sleep. I know this very well from first hand experience, having suffered from poor unrefreshing sleep for years.

After weeks of not sleeping the body’s functions become impaired making it extremely difficult to function in a normal way. (Whatever normal is for a fibromyalgia sufferer). 

“If you’re thinking, I don’t have fibromyalgia, it’s still worth giving these suggestions a try.”

“Insomnia, fatigue and pain are all part of life if you live with fibromyalgia.” The symptoms of fibromyalgia, such as fatigue and pain are all made worse with poor quality sleep.

Over time I’ve found some solutions that have helped me get a better nights sleep. Obviously, there’s no one size fits all with these suggestions. That said, it’s still worth giving them a go. Just being aware what might work is useful.

On occasions I still find I have some problems sleeping but I can solve these more effectively than previously.

Common problems experienced range from:

  • getting to sleep
  • staying asleep until morning
  • waking during the night
  • getting back to sleep after waking up

Have a look at the following suggestions for improving your sleep

  • Go for regular exercise every morning, for example a walk 

  • Check your bedroom temperature and lighting are beneficial for sleep 

  • Adjust your bed and pillows to make it as comfy as possible 

  • Invest in a electric blanket to warm the bed before you get in and help relax muscles 

  • Avoid smoking, over eating or drinking caffeine directly before bedtime 

My top tips for getting to sleep

  • Help your mind wind down for the day
  • Get into a regular sleep routine for adjusting your Circadian rhythm, try to get up at the same time every day
  • Turn off all devices that emit blue light an hour before bedtime
  • Read a relaxing book or listen to gentle music
  • Try a meditation, like yoga nidra or one for helping you to get to sleep 
  • Use ear plugs and a eye mask to block unwanted noise and light
  • Get into a comfortable sleep position and then try a relaxation routine 

Whilst you are asleep make sure your room doesn’t have anything that will wake you like a mobile phone.

A pet that sleeps in your bedroom and disturbs you in the night, should be encouraged to sleep elsewhere.

If you wake in the night and cannot get back to sleep get up and find something that makes you drowsy like reading or a yoga nidra sleep meditation then return to bed.

If you find by morning you have not had enough sleep go back to bed and sleep for a while longer. If you catch up with a couple of hours sleep every night you will see the difference after a few months.

I recently read several articles which mentioned vitamin D (sunlight) exposure daily in the morning shortly after rising can help and mindfulness meditation both improved the quality of sleep in fibromyalgia sufferers. 

I believe this to be true because I usually get up and do a daily walk every morning and this regulates my circadian rhythm over the next 24 hours. It’s more important to get up at the same time every day than the time I go to sleep. 

I’ve found improvements in my concentration and ability to switch off at night after practicing regular Meditation on a daily basis. Explore meditation apps for sessions covering mindfulness and sleep. Have a look at my Fibromyalgia Self Help pages on  Meditation and  Exercise

If you have insomnia and it’s not necessarily fibromyalgia related, get it checked out by your doctor or health professional. If they prescribe sleeping pills it would be advisable to be referred to see a specialist sleep consultant.

Have a look at the  NHS sleep self assessment  to determine how good your sleep is.  From this link you will find some helpful information about sleep.