Mobility Secrets with Fibromyalgia

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It’s really important to keep as healthy as possible, as your level of stamina fluctuates so much.

When you have Fibromyalgia it is a daunting prospect, keeping fit. Particularly starting out for the first time, with a new exercise.

On a visit to my Physiotherapist recently I mentioned I go walking regularly. She said doing moderate exercise can build up strength and help with mobility.

After I was was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2004, I found that exercise helped me a lot to keep a reasonable level of mobility. But I struggled to find things I could do. 

I have made a list of everything that has helped me that you could try. If you’re starting out try hydrotherapy first and then some gentle flexibility exercises.

Hydrotherapy

I found gentle exercise in a warm water pool can help. The water supports your body and has less impact on muscles and joints.

Research has shown that lying in warm water helps the body to relax and lowers pain perception.

A therapist that specialises in hydrotherapy or a qualified physiotherapist that has a good understanding of fibromyalgia, can help you to work out some exercises.

Your local sports centre or gym may have these facilities and let you have a couple of trial sessions.

Sitting Exercises

If you have limited mobility, sitting exercises could be a better option than other ways of exercise.

The NHS website has sitting exercises along with flexibility exercises that might be worth trying.

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Pilates

Pilates strengthens the body as a whole, the main aim is to improve core strength. Regular sessions can help to reduce the risk of injury by increasing flexibility.

I  developed my own tailored exercise routine, by trying out different exercises, from visits to a physiotherapy practitioner.

If you go for physio ask the practitioner for advice and help about what exercises are best for you.

I practice these regularly once a day, for about ten minutes in total. Although, I had to work up to doing this amount gradually at first.

Walking

I found walking to be the most accessible and best for my circumstances.  Walking can help to boost your energy levels and enjoy nature.

If you suffer from low mood, walking on a regular basis is a good non medical therapy, to help feel more positive.

If you are on a low-income, it’s no problem to try out as there is no sign up charges.

If you are new to walking it is best to start with 5 to 10 minutes at first and gradually increase this as your body gets used to the exercise

You will need to try out a pattern that suits you.

When you first start you may need to get some comfortable shoes and wrap up well with thermal layers on cold days.

Have a look at my post on walking  for more tips.

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The NHS live well  website has a lot of really useful tips to get you active.

I hope this post has helped to give you ideas to improve mobility for Fibromyalgia. My goal is as always to help others with Fibromyalgia and similar invisible illness.

 

#Autumn approaches

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It’s that time of year again when it starts to get cooler, after the baking summer sun. The days grow shorter and leaves on the trees are just starting to change colour. 

I’ve written a poem inspired by the changing landscape called Autumn Chill.

🍂 Autumn Chill 🍂

 

Light picks out the gentle rippling on a lake

Clouds hang heavily in the sky above

 

Their grey shadows dance clumsily on the water

revealing a light mist in the distance

 

Splinters of brilliant light highlight treetops

Golden hues glinting their changing colours

 

The air feels cool and fresh

Still a brief hint of summer lingers

 

Subtle leaf tones of red, purple, orange and green

Jump towards me from a transforming bush

 

The weakening sunlight is fading now

Autumn splendour slowly unfolding 

Poem by Nick

If you enjoyed reading this poem, take a look at my other poems and short stories. I’ve recently included a menu header with them all in one section entitled Poetry and Writing.

Your working, with fibromyalgia?

Yes

I’ve had fibromyalgia since 2004 and have kept working.

How?

Fibromyalgia is not a degenerative disease; studies have shown, for most sufferers it will stay the same or improve. Knowing this fact can help to give you a positive outlook on your future. Perhaps working towards small achievable goals to improve your health.

My story 

When I was first diagnosed and before this.  I felt tired, fatigued and had pain in my body for months that just got worse. Nothing I did seemed to help. To some extent it was a relief to find out what was wrong.  I had managed to keep working and had odd days off.  These days stretched into longer periods of time off. 

After the fibromyalgia diagnosis, I slowly started to learn, how to manage my symptoms on a daily basis. Finding out my limitations and how much I could do without making my symptoms worse or triggering a flare up took time to find out. I found stress played a big part in making symptoms worse. Making sure I took adequate rest breaks during the day was essential. 

At some point during these initial first weeks you will want to consider what changes you need to make in your life to help manage fibromyalgia symptoms. One of them may be to re-evaluate your work choices. Perhaps looking at alternative jobs after doing thorough research.

Thinking about what would help you do your existing job and talking to your employer is worth considering. Beforehand gather together evidence to support your diagnosis such as doctors letters. Get the support of your superior and other more senior staff.  Explain what your symptoms are and how they affect you. Perhaps taking along a diary of symptoms, would be easier to illustrate how to adapt your job. Approach this in a positive way showing you can be flexible.

If you are newly diagnosed, your first step could be to educate others working with you, what fibromyalgia is. Your relationship with colleagues is important when your working, if they have a understanding of your condition it will help you feel more confident about work.

Things that could help you……

If you live in the UK have a look at the following information.

If your looking for a job, finding work with an employer in the UK who is disability confident can make a difference. Depending on what they have signed up to they are encouraged to recruit new staff and retain existing employees who would be defined under the equality act 2010 as having a disability.

The equality act 2010 states that all employers in the UK must make reasonable adjustments  for people with disabilities, or a long term health condition, so they aren’t disadvantaged when carrying out their jobs. 

Your employer can look at ways you can adapt your role, within the reasonable adjustments criteria. This could include switching your working hours to more suitable times or looking at special equipment to help you carry out your role. 

A UK access to work  assessment may be able to highlight things you have overlooked that could help you carry out your work. The assessor contacts you to find out more about your circumstances and makes recommendations to suit you.

So, what else can I do?

I personally think that having a long term health condition has made me more aware of my health and well-being. I look after myself better than some of my peers.

Because I need to exercise regularly to keep my body moving I have a very good awareness of what I need to do to keep as fit and healthy as possible.

Take a look at my pages on

Exercise

Diet and Irritable Bowel Syndrome and

Fibromyalgia Self Help.

Telling your family and friends and explaining how it affects you. With their support you will be able to achieve more.

Having a positive mental attitude and setting yourself realistic goals. I use meditation to help me find focus and a positive direction in my daily life. Follow my link to meditation  for information about this.

Lastly…post me your experiences of working with fibromyalgia and other related illnesses.