Living an exceptional life with Fibromyalgia

photo of pink roses in vase

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Following on from a recent post highlighting inspiring people who despite illness and injury, have lived exceptional lives.

I’m focusing on Florence Nightingale mentioned in my page about me I want to explore a bit more about her life and link to fibromyalgia. 

Florence was quoted as saying

“There is no part of my life, upon which I can look back without pain”

Florence was born on May 12, 1820, in Florence, Italy, after which she was named. She was the youngest of two children.

Florence was born into a wealthy family and was expected to get married and have a children. Florence rebelled against this stereotype. She had always helped to care for sick people and started working as a nurse.

Florence was sent to nurse injured soldiers during the Crimean War. She proved to be a very dedicated nurse; visiting the injured every evening on a regular basis which started the phrase ‘the Lady with the Lamp’.

Because of her influence in nursing practices unsanitary areas were improved which increased the survival rate of patients.

Florence wrote about her nursing techniques from experience, which formed the basics for standards in nursing care adopted for the profession.

During 1860 St Thomas’ Hospital and the Nightingale School for Nursing was opened.

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Florence and fibromyalgia

Florence suffered from an invisible illness after she returned from nursing solders in the Crimea War.

Her symptoms are reminiscent of fibromyalgia; which was not a recognised condition at the time. Florence spent prolonged periods in bed, due to her illness. This was probably triggered by excessive stress carrying out her duties nursing in terrible conditions.

In recent years soldiers from the Gulf  War have gone on to develop fibromyalgia after they returned from war. The unbearable stress they were exposed to at that time triggering fibromyalgia.

Florence died on August 13, 1910; she received the Order of Merit in 1907 for her contribution to modern nursing practices. Florence was an amazing woman who cared for others and put others health before her own.

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Easter 🐥 Greetings

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Magnolia Photo by Nick

In this Easter week I wish you peace, happiness and relaxation.

I thought I would post some photos from my walks in parks nearby.  Everything seems to be coming alive at this time of year.

The flowers and trees look so beautiful, it would be great to share them.

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White Narcissi Photo by Nick

I’ve added a short poem based on the seasons of the apple tree.

Apple Tree Seasons 

In Spring, pink apple blossom grow delicate buds

New life springs forth

 

In Summer, fully grown blooms take shape as apples

Warm,strong sunlight help them form

 

In Autumn, rosy red, sweet tasting apples

Ready to pick from the tree

 

In Winter, a bare tree stands out amongst

White snow, goodness going back to the roots

Poem by Nick

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Keeping Active with Fibromyalgia

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Now that Spring is here and we are beginning to have lighter evenings. It’s a good time to consider reviewing your fitness and exercise regime if you have one.

After I was was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2004, I found that exercise helped me a lot as I struggled to find things I could do. When you have Fibromyalgia it is a daunting prospect, keeping fit. Particularly starting out for the first time, with a new exercise.

It’s really important to keep as healthy as possible, as your level of stamina fluctuates so much.

I have made a list of everything that has helped me that you could try.

Walking

I found walking to be the most accessible and best for my circumstances.  Walking can help to boost your energy levels and enjoy nature.

If you suffer from low mood, walking on a regular basis is a good non medical therapy, to help feel more positive.

If you are on a low-income, it’s no problem to try out as there is no sign up charges.

If you are new to walking it is best to start with 5 to 10 minutes at first and gradually increase this as your body gets used to the exercise.

You will need to try out a pattern that suits you.

When you first start you may need to get some comfortable shoes and wrap up well with thermal layers on cold days.

Have a look at my post on walking  for more tips.

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Hydrotherapy

I found gentle exercise in a warm water pool can help. The water supports your body and has less impact on muscles and joints.

Research has shown that lying in warm water helps the body to relax and lowers pain perception.

A therapist that specialises in hydrotherapy or a qualified physiotherapist that has a good understanding of fibromyalgia, can help you to work out some exercises.

Your local sports centre or gym may have these facilities and let you have a couple of trial sessions.

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Pilates

Pilates strengthens the body as a whole, the main aim is to improve core strength. Regular sessions can help to reduce the risk of injury by increasing flexibility.

I  developed my own tailored exercise routine, by trying out different exercises, from visits to a physiotherapy practitioner.

If you go for physio ask the practitioner for advice and help about what exercises are best for you.

I practice these regularly once a day, for about ten minutes in total. Although, I had to work up to doing this amount gradually at first.

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Sitting Exercises

If you have limited mobility, sitting exercises could be a better option than other ways of exercise.

The NHS website has sitting exercises along with flexibility exercises that might be worth trying.

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The NHS live well  website has a lot of really useful tips to get you active.

I hope this short post has given you some new ideas on exercise for Fibromyalgia. My goal is as always to help others with Fibromyalgia and similar invisible illness.

I’m interested in hearing from any fellow sufferers of Fibromyalgia, particularly if you would like to share your experiences on my blog.